Dodge//SRT expands its high-performance 2020 Charger SRT Hellcat and Scat Pack with new Widebody exterior

The 2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody continues Dodge’s (and FCA at large) tradition of improving on an already successful model by continually adding small refinements, updates, and new models to keep consumer interest high.

Following that formula, Dodge has added an available Widebody package to the Charger for 2020, successfully making everyone forget that this car is at its very roots almost old enough to have a driver’s license. Combine the fantastic Scat Pack with the stunning looks of the Widebody and you have one of the best muscle cars you can buy today.

Wider and More Balanced

The Widebody package on the Dodge Charger adds 3.5 inches of total width to the car and the changes are more than tacked on fenders. The front and rear bumpers have been massaged to add to the menacing look of the Charger Widebody. The front suspension has been stiffened and given thicker sway bars. The electronic power steering has been tuned with driver-selectable modes for the street, track, or comfort. The dampers are three-mode adjustable units that can be adjusted for street, track, or comfort driving. Wider 12-inch wide 305 Pirelli P-Zero tires wrap deep-dish 20″ wheels around all four corners.

The result of the chassis tweaks and wider rubber results in a car that feels much more balanced and controllable than the standard body car. Make no mistake, the Charger is a big car and it still feels every bit as big as it looks, but with more grip and control all around.

Performance

Performance-wise, we tested two Charger Widebody variants relatively close to each other, the Charger R/T Scat Pack Widebody and the Charger Hellcat Widebody.

The Charger R/T Scat Pack Widebody model tested here features the 6.4-liter, 485-horsepower/475 pound-feet of torque naturally aspirated V8. This is a square motor and sounds like an absolute monster when under throttle. There’s no forced induction to mess with here, so power is linear and completely predictable. The 8-speed automatic transmission does a fantastic job of keeping the car in the right gear under normal driving and spirited driving. The sounds are all mechanical and all perfectly beautiful. The 6.4-liter V8 found in the Charger R/T Widebody is simply one of the best sounding engines in any car you can buy today at any price.

The Widebody package is also available on the Hellcat equipped Charger, which features the monstrous 6.2-liter supercharged V8 that produces the famous 707-horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque. Like the R/T Scat Pack version, the Hellcat sends power to the wheels through an 8-speed automatic transmission. The Hellcat variant will do 0-60 around the 3.6-second mark and is good for a sub-11-second 1/4 mile time with the right driver at the helm.

Hit the gas pedal, and the Charger Hellcat’s supercharged V8 roars to life with little lag to speak of, but the whine from the massive supercharger sadly drowns out a lot of that fantastic V8 sound. The sound is there, but somehow it’s just not as pure as the one found in the 6.4-liter V8 of the R/T Scat Pack. That’s not to say the engine isn’t lovely to listen to, because it absolutely is. It’s just that Dodge has done such an amazing job with the normally aspirated engine, and it’s a tough act to follow.

The Interior

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody Daytona 50th Anniversary Edition’s race-inspired interior features carbon fiber and unique Daytona blue accent stitching

Not much has changed inside the Charger for 2020. The leather-appointed power seats are still extremely comfortable and provide plenty of lateral support for drivers of all sizes.

The fantastic 8.4-inch UConnect that is ubiquitous across the FCA lineup takes center stage in the center stack and handles all the infotainment duties. This is simply one of the best executions of infotainment in any car I’ve driven to date. CarPlay and Android Auto are standard with the UConnect 8.4. Hard knobs and buttons give occupants options as to how they want to control HVAC and radio functions.

The Uconnect 8.4 also features Performance Apps with a built-in Electronic line-lock that’s selectable through the interface. This allows drivers to lock up the front brakes for burnouts. Other screens show telemetry for engine power output, fluid temperatures, and G-meters for braking, acceleration, and cornering.

So Which One Should You Buy?

The easy answer is to say you should absolutely buy whichever one of these Widebody Chargers fits your budget because you really should have one of these in your garage.

A 2020 Charger R/T Scat Pack Widebody starts at an extremely reasonable $43,140, with our tester topping out in the mid-50s with a substantial list of options. A 2020 Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody starts at $66,520 and can be optioned out to the low-$70s.

With both packages, you get a lot of car for the dollar. For me, though, price aside, the standout winner between the two cars is hands down the Charger Scat Pack Widebody. Again, the Hellcat’s 707-horsepower is stupid fun, but for everyday driving, the 485-horsepower Scat Pack is the standout winner. The power is more useable, the car feels a little lighter on its toes, and honestly, it just sounds better. The extra $20k saved doesn’t hurt either.

That said, you can’t go wrong with either configuration of the Charger Widebody. This is a car that keeps getting better with age like a fine wine. And just like wine, a healthy dose of the Charger Widebody is enough to make anyone’s woes disappear in the rearview mirror.

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Zerin Dube

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