Tag - Hyundai

Great expectations, part 1: 2011 Hyundai Elantra GLS

Hyundai’s made good on a slew of promises over the past few years, from improving the build quality of its products to releasing more interesting, appealing and competitive vehicles. But last year, the company set perhaps its most audacious goal yet: hit a Corporate Average Fuel Economy rating of 50 mpg across its entire range by 2025. Hyundai has already made strides in improving the fuel consumption of its vehicles in recent years. Cars like the redesigned 2011 Elantra, which is rated at 29 mpg city and 40 highway, play an important role in helping the company meet its lofty goals. It’s also helping Hyundai build a lot of brand cache, whose ads are already touting the four models they build that achieve 40 mpg highway.

 

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Korean to go, Part II: The Kia Optima, the Hyundai Sonata, and old-fashioned Americana

When I concluded part I of this feature last week, I said that this piece would be about the Sonata and Optima. It will. But for those of you who came looking for a more traditional road test, I must apologize. You won’t find that here. Feel free to ask specific questions about the cars, but for this piece, we’re going down a slightly different path.

If you ask somebody on the street to identify the most “American” car they can think of, you’ll probably get a predictably narrow subset of answers. SUVs and pick-up trucks will probably top the list, with the occasional Corvette or Mustang thrown in for flavor. Some may even identify entire brands–Jeep or Cadillac, for instance. Others may reflect on our heritage of being one of the largest sources of mass-produced goods in the world, and then prattle on endlessly about the Model T.

But they’re all wrong. You see, the above cars may be icons of the American auto industry, but they simply represent what we’re good at. Those are cars of and by Americans, but not for. Anybody can appreciate a well-built truck or a go-anywhere SUV, but for our purposes we must look elsewhere. Indeed, to find a reflection of American culture, you need to look a a segment which, ironically enough, American manufacturers seemed to have virtually abandoned until very recently–a segment so seemingly devoid of character that it has been dominated for nigh on twenty years by the Toyota Camry. Yes, dear reader, the quintessential American car is the mid-sized sedan.

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Korean to go, part I: Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 R-Spec

Lousy photograph by Byron Hurd

It’s a brisk, gray November day. My gaze wanders around the paddock at Virginia International Raceway. It was a day much like this one that I first drove VIR in my Mazda6 (exactly three years prior to this posting). As then, I’m here with TrackDaze, only this time I’m doing hot laps in somebody else’s car.

Right. The car.

I arrived in the driver’s seat of a 2011 Genesis Coupe 3.8 R-Spec, but I’ll be leaving in the passenger seat of a tow truck. I look down, my thumb hovering over the the send button on my phone. I re-read the message I’ve prepared for my friend and instructor, still trying to absorb the magnitude of what has happened.

“I broke the Genesis.” 


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2011 NAIAS – Hyundai Veloster Reveal Gallery

Photos by Zerin Dube

Hyundai pulled the wraps off the new 3-door hatchback Veloster.  The Veloster is powered by a 1.6-liter GDI Gamma engine which produces 138 horsepower and is estimated to get up to 40 miles per gallon on the highway.  Weighing in at only 2,584 pounds, the Veloster is meant to be a sporty vehicle that delivers utility with a fun driving experience without stepping on the toes of the more performance oriented Genesis coupe.

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Prepare to Believe: A Weekend with the 2010 Hyundai Genesis Coupe Sport and the 2010 Kia Soul Sport

BothCars

Call me skeptical. Go ahead; it’s a label I wear with pride. I’m a half-ass Catholic with a solid education, and though I chose to pursue the arts instead of the sciences, I evaluate the results of both disciplines with a critical eye. Blind faith is another matter entirely (unless we’re talking about the spectacular Magic Hat brew, which is a notion I can fully support). So a couple years ago, when I was a bit more naïve and a steadfast Euro devotee, I chuckled at my auto industry friends’ (and Kia’s and Hyundai’s) insistence that the Korean manufacturers were poised to take the auto landscape by storm.

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